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Getting a TR6 after more than 40 years

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  • #31
    Originally posted by poolboy View Post
    I think I'm going to change tacks.
    For more than 40 years, you've had this image in your mind about the TR6 you wanted when the time was right....I'm going to suggest you go for it; but keep in mind something that "tr250" mentioned in Post 25...."Then the other 69 stuff that if you don’t have, you hurt the value".
    You can find the missing stuff...make it right if that's what you want. It's been your dream; it will take some additional time work and effort and undoubtedly more money after the purchase...but don't end up having regrets for not fulfilling that 40 year old dream.
    Thank you. Can you or anyone else say more about limited flywheel options, and/or other issues with the 69. I am being moved off the 69 to perhaps a 70/71. Is there a good book people can recommend that would help me with this. I have read the short buyers guides which helps but I would like more detail.

    I am feeling a bit bad about posting so much, but this seems the best way to get the benefit of everyone's experience.
    To that end, I am going to start another thread which will be a survey of what members have paid for cars initially, how much they spent on them, and how much they think they are worth now/or what they sold for. I know it will be unscientific because there are so many variables but I want to do this to see if I should modify my expectations of what to buy in the first place and perhaps do some of what you said, get a reasonably good car and start from there. As long as the bones are good, the rest can come easily. My worry has been that unless the frame and other weak areas have been recently viewed/repaired and documented, there is no way to know for sure what the condition of the frame is. You can tell a bad one, but you can to tell how much life is left in one that 'appears' good.

    Comment


    • poolboy
      poolboy commented
      Editing a comment
      Some of what you are asking to be revealed in your 'survey' may be in the "TOP SECRET"files ..
      And me, I actually do not want to know what I've spent since the original purchase....If I did I'm sure I couldn't afford it.

  • #32
    There is a book... "Collector's Originality Guide" which covers any model TRiumph Sports Car from TR2 to TR8
    It's written by Bill Piggott with beautiful color photographs by Simon Clay which illustrates many of the detailed features that Bill describes.
    Driving a 1973 TR6
    Doing ZS carb repairs
    email kencorsaw"at"aol.com

    Comment


    • #33
      The 69 had a longer crank in the back. The flywheel was roughly 22 pounds. Post 69 I think they went to around 28 pounds. If you wanted to do a lighter flywheel, there are mire options available for 70-76. I don’t think the piggott book covered that, but it’s pretty good.

      As as far as the frame goes, you can get a sense of condition from the bottom side and condition of the body. For instance if the topside looks like crap(Rusty), could be the top of the frame is rusty. The bottom can be inspected from underneath. The key is to know what you’re looking at. So have someone look at it or post lots of pics here. Simple

      Again, many times people fail to find poor body work and or paint

      Don't know your budget or capabilities??

      Oh, we have a pretty good buyers guide here. Read it
      So much rust, so little time

      Comment


      • #34
        Originally posted by tr250 View Post
        The 69 had a longer crank in the back. The flywheel was roughly 22 pounds. Post 69 I think they went to around 28 pounds. If you wanted to do a lighter flywheel, there are mire options available for 70-76. I don’t think the piggott book covered that, but it’s pretty good.

        As as far as the frame goes, you can get a sense of condition from the bottom side and condition of the body. For instance if the topside looks like crap(Rusty), could be the top of the frame is rusty. The bottom can be inspected from underneath. The key is to know what you’re looking at. So have someone look at it or post lots of pics here. Simple

        Again, many times people fail to find poor body work and or paint

        Don't know your budget or capabilities??

        Oh, we have a pretty good buyers guide here. Read it
        Thanks very much. I have read the guide a couple of times. It is helpful generally, but does not cover the differences between years we have been discussing. To answer your question, my total budget is about $25k - I might stretch a bit if needed. For that I don't expect a concours car, but one that is pretty recently restored and very solid mechanically, structurally (i.e., frame and suspension) and cosmetically. I think this is possible. Why I was going to do a survey was to get a handle on how this turned out for others. The conventional wisdom seems to be, get something restored, rather than one you will have to restore since that costs so much more.

        BTW - I thought a lighter flywheel would be best. If you go too light, you start to have drivability problems. I have had light flywheels on track cars, but this is just going to be a pleasure/street car. I do take the point about having more options for things though.

        I appreciate the pointer to the book. I found a used copy on Amazon. The new copies are $528.

        Comment


        • #35
          Wow 25k. You might get some takers on this site. You should get a pretty nice car for 25k!!

          So much rust, so little time

          Comment


          • #36
            Originally posted by tr250 View Post
            Wow 25k. You might get some takers on this site. You should get a pretty nice car for 25k!!
            Thanks, the advice here and elsewhere was spending the money up front was a better way to go getting a car that needed work. Taking the restoration route is always more expensive - so I have been told. Having done this many years ago, I think it is true.

            My expectation for this price is that the frame/suspension/underpinnings are all in like new or better condition (e.g., the frame has had the strengthening fixes applied). The interior is like new, and all the mechanicals are like new, and the paint is very fresh. Not a concours car, but heading in that direction.

            A reasonable expectation?

            Comment


            • #37
              25k will get you an excellent TR6. Your expectations are reasonable.

              Here's a good place to find comps. Scroll down to get past auctions.

              https://bringatrailer.com/triumph/tr6/
              1972 Sapphire TR6 #CC84,something

              1959 Red TR3 (Wife's)

              Comment


              • #38
                Originally posted by skootch13 View Post
                25k will get you an excellent TR6. Your expectations are reasonable.

                Here's a good place to find comps. Scroll down to get past auctions.

                https://bringatrailer.com/triumph/tr6/
                Thanks very much. I think the most expensive sale was 22K for a pretty nice car, so if I go to 25k or thereabout, I should get what I want. It just may take some time.

                Comment


                • #39
                  There was a restored 69 that went for 34.5k. Even it had some non 69 things...a trained eye could spot but not most. Still a very nice car
                  So much rust, so little time

                  Comment


                  • #40
                    Originally posted by tr250 View Post
                    There was a restored 69 that went for 34.5k. Even it had some non 69 things...a trained eye could spot but not most. Still a very nice car
                    I think I remember seeing that somewhere but can not recall where now. That would be more than I could pay.

                    Comment


                    • #41
                      Two and a half years ago I was in the same position as you, but ended up buying a rolling restoration. Yes, I will spend more that it's worth when it's all said and done. But the personal satisfaction has been immense so far. I pretty much know every inch, every bolt and bearing in my car. I wonder what I did with my spare time before I bought this TR6??? These cars require a lot of care and attention. I believe that if I had spent $25K on a very nice restoration, things would still break and I would be upset that I spent so much on a car that still needs me to spend more money on it. I would have never gained the understanding of these cars that I have now. Of course, restoration is definitely not for everyone. I've probably spent $2K on tools alone. Some of us aren't as mechanically inclined, or just don't have the time or space to work on a car like this. Totally understandable. But if you want to experience true pride in ownership, yank the gearbox out and rebuild it. Or completely rebuild the front and rear suspension, brakes and steering. If I can do it, just about anybody can.
                      Pete, Collierville TN
                      1976 CF54385 U
                      A rolling resto in progress...

                      Comment


                      • SapphireBlue72
                        SapphireBlue72 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Well spoken, Pete. I have thought the same thoughts many times.
                        You learn about the car & you get immense self-confidence in your wrenching abilities.
                        The TR6 is kind of a PITA, but the final driving experience is exhilarating- much more so when you have fixed it yourself.

                    • #42
                      Originally posted by prasnick View Post
                      Two and a half years ago I was in the same position as you, but ended up buying a rolling restoration. Yes, I will spend more that it's worth when it's all said and done. But the personal satisfaction has been immense so far. I pretty much know every inch, every bolt and bearing in my car. I wonder what I did with my spare time before I bought this TR6??? These cars require a lot of care and attention. I believe that if I had spent $25K on a very nice restoration, things would still break and I would be upset that I spent so much on a car that still needs me to spend more money on it. I would have never gained the understanding of these cars that I have now. Of course, restoration is definitely not for everyone. I've probably spent $2K on tools alone. Some of us aren't as mechanically inclined, or just don't have the time or space to work on a car like this. Totally understandable. But if you want to experience true pride in ownership, yank the gearbox out and rebuild it. Or completely rebuild the front and rear suspension, brakes and steering. If I can do it, just about anybody can.
                      I see your point. As I mentioned previously, I was mechanic for a few years many years ago and did a lot of work on Triumphs, MGs, and lots of other english cars. I am at a point in my life where doing the work and putting in the time I know that is required is not something I want to do. So yes, I will miss some of the pride and satisfaction, but everything is a trade off :-)

                      Comment


                      • #43
                        Originally posted by JonS View Post

                        I am at a point in my life where doing the work and putting in the time I know that is required is not something I want to do. So yes, I will miss some of the pride and satisfaction, but everything is a trade off :-)
                        If that's really your attitude, don't buy an old car, no matter how good of shape you think it is when you buy it...If you drive it you'll be working on it....and if you previously worked as a mechanic, you should know that.
                        Last edited by poolboy; 08-05-2019, 09:11 PM.
                        Driving a 1973 TR6
                        Doing ZS carb repairs
                        email kencorsaw"at"aol.com

                        Comment


                        • #44
                          PB does have a point. Now I suppose you can hire a shop to do the work so it’ll depend upon how badly you want to own a TR6. There is nothing wrong w hiring a shop to do the work. Many guys do it. They may not post here very often? I dunno. Just be prepared to pay the prevailing shop wage

                          There are lots of cars out there that you simply hop in & turn the key. (Or start button these days). No choke cable, no vapor lock when hot, no sticky heater valves, weather tight, and they can get out of their own way.

                          In addition to my TRs, I have a Z4 as my daily. Great experience, less mtce although they are temperamental. But I still love my TRs.

                          I helped a guy look at a car once. First thing I asked (never met him prior)...why do you want one and are you prepared to work on it?

                          Maybe you’re just referring to major stuff too...not clear?

                          So much rust, so little time

                          Comment


                          • #45
                            Originally posted by poolboy View Post

                            If that's really your attitude, don't buy an old car, no matter how good of shape you think it is when you buy it...If you drive it you'll be working on it....and if you previously worked as a mechanic, you should know that.
                            That sounds a bit self-righteous. There is a big difference between taking a TR-6 apart to the frame and building it up and doing a tune-up. I have been in touch with a shop near enough to me that could help, but it might be a year or two before a complete rebuild was done. It would have to be at a shop because I don't have the space at my house for a task of this kind. The shop does let you work with them which is nice, but in the end it would be far more $$$ than buying one in very good shape.

                            Comment


                            • poolboy
                              poolboy commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Self righteous ?...OK let me amend that ....."if you drive it 'somebody' will be working on it." Otherwise I don't think it needs any sugar coating.

                          Getting a TR6 after more than 40 years

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