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About to acquire a my dad's 1976 TR6 - what to attack first?

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  • About to acquire a my dad's 1976 TR6 - what to attack first?

    My dad is finally relinquishing his (one-owner) '76 TR6 to me this summer. It's been loved and well taken care of, always garaged since he bought it new. Low miles - if I remember correctly, somewhere around 32,000 in all. However, it hasn't run since about 2004 or so. At that time, he and I had just completed a bunch of work on it - new rear diff, new exhaust, drain and coat gas tank, rebuild carbs, new gaskets, brakes, etc etc. Everything was in prime condition at that point aside from the carbs being a little finicky and he just never got back to tweaking those.

    So at this time, 15 years later, what all should I be planning on addressing to get her roadworthy again?

    It has dual Strombergs currently, but we also have a set of triple Webers as well - debating which I want to try and get running on it.

    I know I'm in for all new fluids, and probably most seals/gaskets again as well. New tires and hoses. New filters. What else should I be looking at?

    Tangentially related - anyone else in the Southeast Wisconsin area? Any recommended TR shops in that area that could help with tire mounting and alignments?

  • bchesh
    replied
    I acquired my father's 1971 TR6 after he had passed in 2009. He had purchased it new, I was 16 at the time and loved it. I put the first scratch on it (waxing with a big belt buckle). The car was in great shape, I started with replacing the front end bushings and just drove it and replaced/repaired things as they happened. Enjoy and make it yours.

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  • rswafford
    replied
    I definitely will be doing that -- soon as I get them in my hands I'll be giving poolboy a shout. Later this summer...

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  • SapphireBlue72
    replied
    Send the Strombergs to poolboy to rebuild- you will get better results than you can ever imagine, or even then you can do yourself.
    Get 'em done before he retires.
    His price is way, way too cheap, but don't tell him that.

    Leave a comment:


  • rswafford
    replied
    I misspoke, it's not triple webers, but rather dual downdraft webers. When last running, it had better compression on the engine than a friend's who'd done the shaved head treatment to his 6. Think I'll start with have the Strombergs rebuilt and get it running, then I can screw with the webers.

    All the emission control crap has been removed and plugged years ago.

    Definitely going to start with the basics, fluids and the like, and just get it back on the road. Can't wait to take my kids for a country drive in it.

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  • YankeeTR5
    replied
    Been there done that on many TR's over the years. At least your gas tank was relined...hopefully the lining hasn't separated.
    I use a four step process:
    1)remove spark plugs and spray some penetrating oil into each cylinder. Reinsert plugs. Let sit overnight
    2)drain gas tank. Add gas
    3)change oil
    4)Crank over engine with coil wire removed until oil pressure rises. Reattach coil wire. Start car.

    At this point you can figure out what else may be needed (like carb rebuild) but until you get it started you won't know.

    I would suggest that history has shown many new owners end up digging deep holes trying to "revive" a car by jumping into the deep end and doing odd things that aren't relevant to getting it started. Including...."suspension bushings looked cracked so I better rebuild the front suspension before starting". These cars are often sold without much if any miles driven on them. Anyway, my point was going to be that many of the deferred or now needed maintenance items can be done once the car is driving. Way more motivation that way.

    These engines are not delicate, in fact they're downright robust. Waking one up isn't that big a deal especially given yours has low miles and known history when it was parked.

    Triple webers will not work on your car as is. Way to little compression. So to use the triples, you're gonna have to pull the head and have it shaved.
    On the 76 there's other things I'd eliminate at the same time.....the air pump, the injector lines into the exhaust manifold.

    That said, I think given the low mileage I'd keep it as original as I could. Lots of warmed over cars available, far fewer originals

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  • ima68tr
    replied
    Originally posted by rswafford View Post

    It has dual Strombergs currently, but we also have a set of triple Webers as well - debating which I want to try and get running on it.
    Triple Webers will deliver TR6 nirvana in the right hands ( small club on this forum though - see the UK forum or TRIUMPH EXPERIENCE for a large one ) but if and only if the cam and head / compression ratio are P.I. specification or beyond; the U.S. market emissions spec engines won't make more HP unless supercharged. The Webers will outperform all but modern EFI systems which will only slightly edge them out, and that at the expense of the vintage nature the TRs so quaintly exemplify. I've done over 130K miles with mine since 1996 and will never revert to Strombergs or SUs for that matter. Nothing else on the entire vehicle is as reliable or enduring as these either.

    I reckon once you get it running as it did when new you'll be itching to get more power and torque out of it, if only to keep up with modern traffic. Check back then and Weber enthusiasts will be happy to advise.

    Tom


    Last edited by ima68tr; 03-14-2019, 10:00 AM.

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  • tr6harris
    replied
    And of course when you get it running again, be sure to get dad out and about!

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  • Elwood
    replied
    Originally posted by The Skip View Post
    Have a look at Northshore Sportscars in Lake Bluff,IL. Besides maintenance, parts, etc., they offer seasonal storage if that might be of interest in the frozen tundra of Wisconsin winter.
    These are good guys, but very expensive and IMO, not nearly as talented as Steve Yott.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Skip
    replied
    Have a look at Northshore Sportscars in Lake Bluff,IL. Besides maintenance, parts, etc., they offer seasonal storage if that might be of interest in the frozen tundra of Wisconsin winter.

    Leave a comment:


  • lfmTR4
    replied
    The list is overwhelming. I would try to turn the engine over by hand, if that works it’s good news. Change the oil and filter, check the coolant. I would rig up a temporary gas tank and hook the hose up before the pump. Then try to crank it. Of course next would be to drain the old gas, check the tank and refill. Make sure you have good hydraulic pressure on the brakes and clutch before you try to drive it, then give it a go and start the list. Don’t be scared of a little smoke until the rings and valves free up.

    Personally I would go back to Poolboy rebuilt ZS and eliminate that off the list and there’s way more support here for original equipment. Chances are that the Webers Jets are gummed up with perished gas but you’ll know more when you try to crank it with new gas.

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  • rswafford
    replied
    And I guess my memory is a bit less than stellar. The car currently is sitting with a pair of downdraft Weber carbs on it, and the stock carbs are in a cabinet somewhere.

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  • rswafford
    replied
    [QUOTE=Elwood;n520754]
    Originally posted by rswafford View Post
    Thanks for the replies already!

    Phil - my dad was a member of ISOA for quite a while back in the late 70s through the 80s at least (he lives in central Illinois).

    Please tell your dad that Irv Korey says hi. I remember your dad well, and also his/your TR6. Steve Yott at the Silver Lake TRiumph Centre is also a member of ISOA, and is a former dealer mechanic.
    Silver Lake is probably less than an hour from New Berlin. Steve is a terrific mechanic and fabricator. If you run into something that you can't handle, Steve can take care of it for you. Good luck with your TR6.
    Irv - dad says hi. Remembers you as well, thanks for the well wishes!

    Leave a comment:


  • Elwood
    replied
    Originally posted by rswafford View Post

    Tangentially related - Any recommended TR shops in that area that could help with tire mounting and alignments?
    Also in Silver Lake is Silver Lake Auto. It is a BP station, and Harm the owner has the newest and best alignment rack around. He regularly does 4 wheel alignments on TR6's there, and is familiar with the adjustable trailing arm mounts sold by Richard Good and others. He has top notch tire mounting and balancing equipment too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Elwood
    replied
    [QUOTE=rswafford;n520747]Thanks for the replies already!

    Phil - my dad was a member of ISOA for quite a while back in the late 70s through the 80s at least (he lives in central Illinois).

    Please tell your dad that Irv Korey says hi. I remember your dad well, and also his/your TR6. Steve Yott at the Silver Lake TRiumph Centre is also a member of ISOA, and is a former dealer mechanic.
    Silver Lake is probably less than an hour from New Berlin. Steve is a terrific mechanic and fabricator. If you run into something that you can't handle, Steve can take care of it for you. Good luck with your TR6.

    Leave a comment:

About to acquire a my dad's 1976 TR6 - what to attack first?

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