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About to acquire a my dad's 1976 TR6 - what to attack first?

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  • About to acquire a my dad's 1976 TR6 - what to attack first?

    My dad is finally relinquishing his (one-owner) '76 TR6 to me this summer. It's been loved and well taken care of, always garaged since he bought it new. Low miles - if I remember correctly, somewhere around 32,000 in all. However, it hasn't run since about 2004 or so. At that time, he and I had just completed a bunch of work on it - new rear diff, new exhaust, drain and coat gas tank, rebuild carbs, new gaskets, brakes, etc etc. Everything was in prime condition at that point aside from the carbs being a little finicky and he just never got back to tweaking those.

    So at this time, 15 years later, what all should I be planning on addressing to get her roadworthy again?

    It has dual Strombergs currently, but we also have a set of triple Webers as well - debating which I want to try and get running on it.

    I know I'm in for all new fluids, and probably most seals/gaskets again as well. New tires and hoses. New filters. What else should I be looking at?

    Tangentially related - anyone else in the Southeast Wisconsin area? Any recommended TR shops in that area that could help with tire mounting and alignments?

  • #2
    Hey congratulations on getting your dad's TR6. And welcome to 6-Pack. Here is a link to MGexperience.com that gets passed out when someone asks how to awaken a sleeping car. https://www.mgexp.com/article/awaken...eeping-mg.html

    And here's the list;

    So, Let's Wake Her Up:
    Put the car on 4 jack stands & remove wheels.
    If there was an old battery in her, remove it to exchange as a core for a new battery.
    Engine Compartment
    Disconnect fuel lines at carbs.
    Remove spark plugs & turn engine over by hand checking for compression at each spark plug hole (I'm not interested in the amount of compression, just that I still have it!)
    Install new battery (DO NOT ATTEMPT TO START ENGINE!)
    Turn ignition key on & allow fuel pump to drain any gas remaining in the tank (in the event you didn't drain it before laying car up, you'll probably have 'dead' gas in there.)
    If fuel pump doesn't operate, stop & rebuild fuel pump and repeat process of draining gas tank. While you're under there, replace all flexible gas lines to fuel pump.
    Adjust valves.
    Change engine oil and filter. (In cold months, I use 10W-40 Castrol; in warm months, I use 20W-50 Castrol.)
    Install new, properly gapped spark plugs.
    Rebuild distributor (if electronic, check manual closely).
    Install new spark plug wires.
    Check the ignition circuit for proper operation (AGAIN: DO NOT ATTEMPT TO START ENGINE! At this point, all I want to know is if I have 'fire' at the plugs.)
    Drain all fluids (radiator, engine, transmission, rear end, brakes/clutch)
    Inspect radiator for signs of leakage (the proper way to store a radiator is with anti-freeze inside; you can tell if there's been any leakage by the tell-tale wierd, green patina on the core or along the edges of the tanks.). If there are signs of leakage, remove radiator for cleaning, pressurizing, and repair.
    Back flush the engine cooling system to remove any built-up crud.
    Replace engine thermostat.
    Remove the plug in the water pump & add a bit of grease.
    Remove all belts from front of engine.
    Bench check alternator/generator for proper operation.
    With proper spray cleaner, clean all Lucas wiring harness connectors. Once cleaned, coat them with a LIGHT film of conductive grease (I mean every one you can see with the hood up! Take 'em apart & clean both ends of the bullet connectors). Pay especially close attention to the fuse block.
    Replace all belts with new ones and reinstall alternator/generator.
    Reinstall the radiator along with all new hoses.
    Fill windshield washer tank.
    Refill the cooling system with the proper mixture of water and anti-freeze.
    Remove carbs & rebuild/clean them as necessary. Replace air filters.
    Inspect engine mounts & replace as necessary.
    Replace all fuel/vacuum lines in engine compartment.
    Replace fuel filter.
    If so equipped, renew all emissions items to include recharging charcoal canisters. If equipped, remove the hoses from the air pump & spray lithium grease up inside the pump.
    Turn engine over with ignition switch to check compression (AGAIN, DO NOT START ENGINE YET!)
    Underneath Car - Front
    Remove front rotors & check for warpage.
    Turn or replace rotors as necessary.
    Check calipers for proper operation.
    Replace all flexible brake lines.
    Install new brake pads.
    Underneath Car - Center
    Replace fluid in transmission with the same oil you put in engine.
    Grease universal joints/check for looseness.
    Inspect transmission mounts & replace as necessary.
    Visually inspect exhaust for rust/holes, proper installation, etc.
    Visually inspect underside of car for rust.
    Lubricate hand brake.
    Clean all Lucas wiring harness connections & coat with a LIGHT film of conductive grease.
    Underneath Car - Rear
    Remove brake drums. Visually inspect & replace/turn as necessary.
    Replace wheel cylinders (NO! Don't even try to repair - just replace them!)
    Install new brake shoes.
    Replace flexible brake line on passenger side of car.
    Drop gas tank & visually inspect for rust.
    Remove gas sending unit & check for free operation of arm.
    Have gas tank boiled/cleaned as necessary (I take mine to my local radiator repair shop).
    Install cleaned & newly painted gas tank.
    Replace all flexible fuel lines to fuel pump/gas tank.
    Fill rear end with SAE 90 Gear Oil.
    In trunk, if so equipped, replace flexible lines to vapor separator & gas tank.
    Don't take off jack stands yet!
    Put fresh gas in tank & pressurize fuel system to carbs.
    Clean all Lucas wiring harness connections & coat with a LIGHT film of conductive grease.
    Top off brake & clutch master cylinders.
    Bleed clutch slave cylinder & check for proper operation of clutch.
    Bleed brake system starting with driver rear wheel.
    Reinstall wheels & adjust rear brakes.


    FIRE 'ER UP!
    Allow oil pressure to come up & note where it stops at idle.
    Allow car to idle until temperature has come up to normal operation range.
    Make any adjustments to carbs or timing.
    Depress clutch & verify its proper operation.
    Check operation of transmission through all gears.
    Check operation of hand brake.
    Check operation of wheel brakes.
    TURN ENGINE OFF.
    Visually inspect for any leakage along gas, clutch & brake lines, at wheel cylinders & calipers, in cooling system.


    Install & balance new 185x70R14 tires (tubes also if wire wheels) - HEY! They're probably dry rotted!
    Install wheels, adjust rear brakes & take car off jack stands.
    Body
    Check operation of all exterior lights.
    Replace windshield wiper blades & check operation of wiper/washer system.
    Spray lithium grease door, hood, & trunk hinges and latching mechanisms.
    Install one of GEM Enterprises' emergency hood latches.
    Lubricate top bows, seat rails & adjusters.
    Check operation of all dash, interior, & trunk lights and switches.
    Clean all Lucas wiring harness connections & coat with a LIGHT film of conductive grease.
    Engine Compartment
    After engine has cooled down, readjust valves.
    Check/refill cooling system as necessary.
    Check engine oil level.
    NOW, it's time for a short test drive. Once around the block only. While driving, pay particular attention to status of gauges, check for proper operation of brakes, watch for tell-tale signs of smoke from exhaust.

    Back in the Garage
    Recheck all engine fluid levels.
    Check belt tension.
    Check clutch & brake master cylinder levels (look for signs of leakage in engine compartment, under dash, and on garage floor under car).
    Put car on jack stands.
    Recheck rear brake adjustment.
    Tighten lug nuts (or wire wheel center cap).
    Put her on the ground.
    At this point, feel free to drive down to the nearest filling station and fill up with 93-octane gas. I know, I know! Some of you are going to tell me that's not necessary. But, hey, that's all I ever put in my cars. I personally feel its needed all the time but should be used at least once every few tanks full.

    Then, after a good wash, wax, and interior detailing, she's ready for daily use. From this point on, follow the maintenance guidelines in your owner's manual. Enjoy! Tony
    1972 Sapphire TR6 #CC84,something

    1959 Red TR3 (Wife's)

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome! You've come to the right place. I recommend searching the forum for something like "Sleeping TR6". There have been numerous posts on the topic.

      This is a great bunch of people with a huge wealth of knowledge and a real desire to help so you should be in great shape.

      I live in northern Illinois and there's a very active club in the area called ISOA that you should consider. As for shops, Silver Lake Triumph is one of the best. Steve Yott (also a member of ISOA) runs the shop and knows about all there is to know about these cars.

      Silver Lake Triumph Centre
      1000 E. Lotus Dr. Unit #7
      Silver Lake, WI 53170
      262-885-4885
      tr4@wi.rr.com

      Last edited by phil73; 03-13-2019, 09:04 AM.
      73 TR6
      Libertyville, IL
      My TR6

      Comment


      • #4
        Remove the Zenith-Strombergs and ship them to poolboy to work his magic on checking & adjusting them.
        That way you can rule out fuel delivery issues.
        That's what I did and it was a great decision, and inexpensive, as well.
        Walt
        CC80954U '72 TR6 original condition/sold 16.500.
        poolboy rebuilt the Z-S Carbs. Philstr6 rebuilt both rear hubs.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Walt !
          Yeah, don't even consider the Webers, until you can get the engine and car performing normally with the ZS carbs...I mean in every way, starting, idling, accelerating (and stopping.
          Then if you're not happy, decide on what you'd like to modify; but get it running and driving normally first.
          And, btw, that gas tank coating could cause problems if it hasn't already, sloughing off clogging the fuel delivery....It happens so be prepared to replace the tank
          Driving a 1973 TR6
          Doing ZS carb repairs
          email kencorsaw"at"aol.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the replies already!

            Phil - my dad was a member of ISOA for quite a while back in the late 70s through the 80s at least (he lives in central Illinois). I remember going to VTR Conventions with my folks several times as a little kid. I know for sure we went to the convention in Pennsylvania in '86 or so, and again in Georgia in 87 or 88. I'm sure we did some other group meets in the Chicago area. Matter of fact, the car has an ISOA emblem on the front bumper, and I've got another one that I "borrowed" as a kid because I thought it was so cool. I'll definitely check in to joining when I get it up and running again!

            I'm sure I'll also be giving Steve in Silver Lake a shout at some point - that's not far from me now at all, I'm in New Berlin, WI - just outside of Milwaukee.

            poolboy - good advice. If I recall, last time it was running we had it going pretty well but was running richer than it should. I'll keep you in mind when time comes to rebuild. And good to know on the gas tank. I *think* it was coated, but I could be wrong - I know we pulled it and had it professionally cleaned at the very least. I'll verify with my old man when I'm collecting the car and getting all his parts for it.

            Super excited to get started... just have to wait for warmer/dryer weather to get her trailered up from Illinois!

            Comment


            • #7
              When I purchased my '72 TR6 in 2012, the carbs had just been rebuilt by a national award winning certified mechanic. This guy was good, his 5 car shop had everything, including nice cars.
              But, the carbs weren't quite right.

              I packed them into a USPS pre-priced shipping box and sent them to poolboy, on many peoples recommendations.
              When he returned them to me (after a week) the carbs were super clean, polished, preset adjustment so that when they were mounted I just cut the zip tie.

              When the engine was started up after sitting for 4 years, it idled at 500 rpm and the car ran smoothly from those rpm's to redline, then back to idling at 500 rpm.
              I don't recommend people lightly, but if your carbs aren't just perfect, you know who can help.
              Walt
              CC80954U '72 TR6 original condition/sold 16.500.
              poolboy rebuilt the Z-S Carbs. Philstr6 rebuilt both rear hubs.

              Comment


              • #8
                That's a strong endorsement, Walt; thank you very much !
                I think mainly what makes me a little different from the guys who rebuild carbs as a business is that I drive one of these cars and before I literally got talked into offering this service, I spent a couple of years fooling with my own set of ZS carbs....discovering what worked and what didn't and to some extent 'why'.
                I'm still learning and the carbs I rebuild today go thru a little different procedure than the ones I did 7 years ago. I try to keep an open mind about things and every now and then on these old carbs I encounter something for the first time that needs that 'out of the box' solution.
                Anyway, thanks again, Walt..now,back to our regularly scheduled program.
                Driving a 1973 TR6
                Doing ZS carb repairs
                email kencorsaw"at"aol.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  [QUOTE=rswafford;n520747]Thanks for the replies already!

                  Phil - my dad was a member of ISOA for quite a while back in the late 70s through the 80s at least (he lives in central Illinois).

                  Please tell your dad that Irv Korey says hi. I remember your dad well, and also his/your TR6. Steve Yott at the Silver Lake TRiumph Centre is also a member of ISOA, and is a former dealer mechanic.
                  Silver Lake is probably less than an hour from New Berlin. Steve is a terrific mechanic and fabricator. If you run into something that you can't handle, Steve can take care of it for you. Good luck with your TR6.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rswafford View Post

                    Tangentially related - Any recommended TR shops in that area that could help with tire mounting and alignments?
                    Also in Silver Lake is Silver Lake Auto. It is a BP station, and Harm the owner has the newest and best alignment rack around. He regularly does 4 wheel alignments on TR6's there, and is familiar with the adjustable trailing arm mounts sold by Richard Good and others. He has top notch tire mounting and balancing equipment too.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=Elwood;n520754]
                      Originally posted by rswafford View Post
                      Thanks for the replies already!

                      Phil - my dad was a member of ISOA for quite a while back in the late 70s through the 80s at least (he lives in central Illinois).

                      Please tell your dad that Irv Korey says hi. I remember your dad well, and also his/your TR6. Steve Yott at the Silver Lake TRiumph Centre is also a member of ISOA, and is a former dealer mechanic.
                      Silver Lake is probably less than an hour from New Berlin. Steve is a terrific mechanic and fabricator. If you run into something that you can't handle, Steve can take care of it for you. Good luck with your TR6.
                      Irv - dad says hi. Remembers you as well, thanks for the well wishes!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        And I guess my memory is a bit less than stellar. The car currently is sitting with a pair of downdraft Weber carbs on it, and the stock carbs are in a cabinet somewhere.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The list is overwhelming. I would try to turn the engine over by hand, if that works it’s good news. Change the oil and filter, check the coolant. I would rig up a temporary gas tank and hook the hose up before the pump. Then try to crank it. Of course next would be to drain the old gas, check the tank and refill. Make sure you have good hydraulic pressure on the brakes and clutch before you try to drive it, then give it a go and start the list. Don’t be scared of a little smoke until the rings and valves free up.

                          Personally I would go back to Poolboy rebuilt ZS and eliminate that off the list and there’s way more support here for original equipment. Chances are that the Webers Jets are gummed up with perished gas but you’ll know more when you try to crank it with new gas.
                          I72 Pimento w/overdrive

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Have a look at Northshore Sportscars in Lake Bluff,IL. Besides maintenance, parts, etc., they offer seasonal storage if that might be of interest in the frozen tundra of Wisconsin winter.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by The Skip View Post
                              Have a look at Northshore Sportscars in Lake Bluff,IL. Besides maintenance, parts, etc., they offer seasonal storage if that might be of interest in the frozen tundra of Wisconsin winter.
                              These are good guys, but very expensive and IMO, not nearly as talented as Steve Yott.

                              Comment

                              About to acquire a my dad's 1976 TR6 - what to attack first?

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