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  • Clutch Replacement

    So the transmission is out, cleaned, and a new throwout bearing installed (new clutch already bolted to flywheel). TRF supplied the clutch kit including the little packet of white grease. I’m guessing I should liberally cost the input shaft where the bearing rides with this grease? Is there any more preparation before I reinstall the transmission? It’s been a while since I’ve done this.

  • #2
    Only other thing to look at is the tapered pin that holds the clutch release fork to it’s shaft. Take it out and look for cracks, this is a known weak point, the pins crack and fail after forty odd years of service. Some folks drill a hole for an additional pin, I reckon that’s a bit of overkill but if you’re a belt and suspenders guy it might be worth it.
    ‘70 TR-6

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    • #3
      Belt + suspenders highly recommended. The bolts, especially the new replacements, always develop cracks.
      CF1634U+O Pimento/Chestnut
      2nd owner, since 1975
      Now in Fair Oaks, CA

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      • #4
        Which bearing did it come with, the RHP or Koyo? Does the carrier have the anti-rotation pin? The white grease is for the snout so that the bearing carrier does not bind. Buckeye Triumphs have some good articles in the tech section of their site on cross drilling the tapered pin and the snout. Check it out. Also make sure you use dowels to fit and align the transmission before tightening the bolts.
        Last edited by lfmTR4; 11-08-2018, 03:39 PM.
        I72 Pimento w/overdrive

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dxeflyr View Post
          So the transmission is out, cleaned, and a new throwout bearing installed (new clutch already bolted to flywheel). TRF supplied the clutch kit including the little packet of white grease. I’m guessing I should liberally cost the input shaft where the bearing rides with this grease? Is there any more preparation before I reinstall the transmission? It’s been a while since I’ve done this.
          Many of us recommend adding a second pin to the fork/crossshaft. It takes the load off the original style tapered pin, which is only there in single shear. My original tapered pin lasted about 125,000 miles and found to be broken when doing a clutch replacement. The second pin lasted about half the miles. Before installing another new pin, I noticed a lot of radial machine marks along the taper. We know that if you want to break something that's hard, put a score on it. That's where it will break. I polished this pin by chucking it up in a drill press. If done with patience, one can get it to spin concentrically, then polish it with a fine emery cloth, like the crocus type till it shines like it was chromed. (Very little material will be removed in this process). I'd like to say this is all that's required so you'll never break another pin, but never got the chance to find out, as a second cross drilling was done at a later time. This held fast till all of this was removed in favor of the hydraulic clutch setup.

          Dick
          Last edited by dicta; 11-08-2018, 09:35 PM.

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          • #6
            So, how did the job go? Clutch back in and working? I did mine this summer on my own and it worked great. It was worth the time and $$ spent.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Neddie Seagoon View Post
              Only other thing to look at is the tapered pin that holds the clutch release fork to it’s shaft. Take it out and look for cracks, this is a known weak point, the pins crack and fail after forty odd years of service. Some folks drill a hole for an additional pin, I reckon that’s a bit of overkill but if you’re a belt and suspenders guy it might be worth it.
              My clutch fork pin failed well before the car was 40 years old. In fact, it was 11 years old when I added the second pin to mine. You are inviting yourself to pull the transmission out again needlessly if you don't address this now.

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              • Neddie Seagoon
                Neddie Seagoon commented
                Editing a comment
                Fair enough, belt and suspenders it is then, I can only tell you that mine went 150k miles before I had to replace the pin.

            • #8
              Salutary tale here - when I did a frame-off, I replaced the clutch. The fork had been drilled for a backup 1/4" pin, which fit quite loosely in the hole, and was slightly bent. I replaced the backup pin with a straight one, BUT DIDN'T REPLACE THE TAPERED PIN because it looked OK . A couple of years later, the clutch is failing to engage (ended up stranded at a green light because I couldn't get it into gear). Pulled the transmission, sure enough the tapered pin was cracked ~ 3/4 around, and the loosely-fitting backup wasn't picking up the slack. I replaced the tapered pin and drilled out the backup hole to take a snugly-fitting 5/16" backup pin. There's no job I hate more than pulling the transmission, and all the interior disassembly that this entails. I could've saved myself this grief if I had simply replaced the tapered pin as a matter of course, and addressed the obviously deficient (in hindsight) backup. From now on, a new tapered pin will be SOP whenever the tranny is out.
              Dave C
              '72 Sapphire #CC82360UO
              Chapel Hill NC

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              Clutch Replacement

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